UMNCLA: Capital Campaign Updates

UMNCLA: Capital Campaign Updates


Lastly, I want to talk about fundraising,
our capital campaign. We launched our capital campaign back in November,
I believe it was, of 2017. Great event, and it’s been a terrific year,
as well, in our Shattering Expectations campaign. In fiscal year 2018, we raised almost $20
million for the campaign. We have raised $112 million total since the
campaign started. Our goal for the campaign is $150 million,
so we’re 75 percent of the way toward that goal. Since the start of the campaign, we’ve had
over 17,000 donors, nearly 7,000 first time donors, and over 650 faculty and staff who
have given to one fund or another. We have three major support areas in our campaign. The first, over here on the left, is you can
think of that as, in a sense, career readiness. Attracting students and developing internships,
research opportunities, learning abroad, and so on. Those kind of extra skills that they develop
beyond the classroom. Providing scholarships and fellowships in
those areas. As you can see, we’ve reached 34 of our $50
million goal there. Over on the right hand side, this is our goal
around inclusiveness, access, and diversity, which we refer to in our plan as engaging
every voice in the drive to discover. We have achieved 70 percent of our goal here,
about $24 million. This would be scholarship support for low
income students, for transfer students, first generation, and so on. Lastly, in the middle group, our largest goal
is around research and engagement. This is traditionally the hardest area to
raise money from because people are used to being students. They like to give scholarships. That’s an easy one. It’s a little harder, sometimes to convince
people to support faculty research, or grad student research and so on, or public engagement. We’ve actually been doing exceptionally well
there, also, as you can see. We’re actually at 74 percent of our goal in
that area. In the road map report, you’ll get a more
detailed listing of the various gifts that we’ve gotten, but let me give you a few examples. We have increased our internship support by
1,500 percent during this campaign. In other words, we had $300,000 of scholarships
in July, 2011 for internships. We now have almost $5 million in scholarships
in June of 2018. As I mentioned earlier, we have increased
our diversity among our faculty. The funds that we’ve gotten through the campaign
have helped to support some of that hiring that we did. Over the last three years, one third of our
faculty have been faculty of color or American Indian. We selected the third cohort of the Talle
Family Faculty Research Awards. This is a program for new associate professors,
to help them launch on their next project. We’ve had over 20 of our associate professors
over the past three years receive these awards. This is a $1.5 million fund over a five year
period. We have been able to fund nine mini and two
full interdisciplinary collaborative workshops. I referenced those before. There’s another deadline for that coming up
soon. I encourage you to look into that. Again, that creates these communities. There’s in a theme, a question, a topic that
brings together people from across the college and even beyond the college, as well. We also were able to use some gift money to
launch the Commons for Research and the Social Sciences. The Commons is a convening spot for conferences,
competitions, discussion groups, workshops, training courses, and so on, that are focused
on managing, analyzing, visualizing, and interpreting, and presenting data. We see this as a great resource that will
grow over time. Lastly, as an example, we’ve received transformative
gifts of faculty and grad student support in a number of departments. There’s three that I’ll mention, Asian Languages
and Literature, German, Nordic, Slavic, and Dutch, and Philosophy all received exceptional
gifts that have allowed them to do things that they were never able to do before. All of that puts us on a really strong road
as we are heading into, now, our next 150 years as a college. All of these accomplishments that I’ve talked
about are…They can be plans on a sheet of paper. It takes people like you in the room. It takes the faculty and staff throughout
the departments, and the college offices to make it a reality. I’m incredibly grateful for the work that
everyone does on these projects, day after day, and week after week, and month after
month. You’ve made an amazing amount happen over
the last several years. There are many, many, many great examples
that I could point to. I will give you a few by way of example. The RIGS initiative, which I mentioned earlier,
created a critical race and ethnic studies graduate student group. They hold biweekly meetings throughout the
academic year where they can support and share their writing, their research, their proposals,
as well as, more generally, creating a community. “Gee Whiz, Professor,” [inaudible 42:23] and
research associate Kari Smolkowski, with a great deal of help from Emilia White back
there, worked with middle school students from Northeast Middle School in Minneapolis
and helped them create their own digital stories on important questions, ranging from social
justice to bullying, and introduced them to college. We brought them to campus for their graduation
ceremony. They’ve been working with our undergraduate
students over the course of almost a year. They’re getting a sense of what it means to
start to think about college and what it means to be a college student. That’s a project in an eighth grade set of
classroom. The economics department, the Heller-Hurwicz
Economics Institute has had very well attended public sessions on public pensions, climate
change, and trade policy, among other topics over the past year. We’ve had a great deal of success with our
faculty engaging in career readiness. I will say, this is one of the things that
marks us as distinctive around the country, that our faculty have been so heavily involved
in this career readiness work. Last year, we had 24 faculty fellows who were
learning more about how they could integrate career readiness into their coursework. We have 14 more this semester. There’s space in the spring semester for faculty
who want to participate, as well. It’s critical that faculty be involved in
this because what we want is for students in their classes to be hearing from a professor
or from an instructor, “This is how what you’re doing connects to one of the core competencies
in CLA career readiness,” whether it’s digital literacy, applied problem solving, or whatever
it might be. We also know that there’s a power of mentorship
that comes with a faculty member or instructor talking to a student about their future. There’s been a lot of research on this lately. It is one of our advantages as a residential
college. It’s one thing we never want to use. Students who come here and establish even
one relationship that feels like a mentoring relationship…It doesn’t mean that it has
to be a meeting with somebody every week, but somebody who cared about them at some
point and said, “I care about your future. This is how what you’re doing right now ties
to that future.” It has an amazing effect on students later
on. It is something that they remember forever. For those of you who saw my monthly memo a
couple of weeks back, I had an amazing mentor like that as an undergrad student who recently
passed away. I wrote a little bit about him, and what he
meant to me, and how he had a life-changing effect on me, and the way I thought about
the world, and I thought about being a professor, and everything else. That gets replicated thousands of times every
day. Through professors talking about, “I care
about your future enough to talk about how this class is building some skills that will
tie to your life when you leave,” is a very powerful thing for students to hear. In that area, also, of career readiness, I
want to say we have had a number of our departments that have committed to being very extensively
involved in working career readiness concepts throughout their curriculum. I’m quite pleased and thankful to them for
doing so.

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