Novel Words

Novel Words


Narrator: Welcome to this
short presentation on Language Modeling and
Conversations: Novel Words. This presentation will
highlight the importance of using new and novel words
in your conversations with children. We will also introduce a few
strategies for using novel words. These strategies help us
build children’s vocabularies and help adults learn
new words as well. The House Framework
helps us think about all of the important
elements needed to support children’s preparation
and readiness for school. The elements are the foundation,
the pillars, and the roof. Language modeling and conversations
is an important part of the foundation. This presentation on novel words is one in a series of modules
designed to help adults support children’s language,
cognitive, and social development and lay the groundwork
for success in school. Teacher: Who knows this
body part here? Children: Antenna! Teacher: What are these body parts? Children: Antennas! Teacher: Antennas. Let’s put our antennas up. Narrator: You’ll recall
that conversations and especially extended
conversations help children develop more
complex language and thinking skills. Extended conversations
are back-and-forth exchanges of several turns between
the child and adult. These exchanges become rich
and even more valuable when adults add varied
vocabulary and sentence forms. This module will focus on adding
varied, new, and novel vocabulary. Children love the new and novel. Get ready to arouse
their curiosity and attention. Why focus on vocabulary? Research tells us that
vocabulary has an impact on how well children
learn to read. Vocabulary is related to children’s
reading comprehension. Child: It’s called…a satellite. Narrator: Vocabulary knowledge
is at the core of how well children understand
ideas and concepts in science, social studies, math,
and other areas of knowledge. And teachers and other adults
take an active and important role in children’s vocabulary development. Let’s look at some ways to build
children’s vocabularies. One method is to embed new
vocabulary into your conversations. When you restate and expand
on what the child says or does, you can add or insert new words. Let’s listen. Teacher: Look, Dylan, look at the roly-poly. Dylan: Oh… Teacher: Isn’t that cool?
It’s got a hard shell on top of it. Or they used to be called potato bugs.
Can you say “potato bugs”? Dylan: Potato bugs. Teacher: Uh-huh… Girl: But it’s a roly-poly. Teacher: Uh-huh… Because when you touch it,
what does it do? Girl: It rolls up into a ball. Narrator: Another way to help
build children’s vocabularies is to intentionally teach new words. Identify new words to use
in lessons or activities. Plan ahead so that you can
give the definition and use the word in a sentence. Girl: It’s mixing up into the water. Teacher: Yeah, it’s dissolving in the water! Boy: I cannot see any more
sugar in my water. Child: Me either! Child: Me, either! Girl: I still can. Teacher: Can you see any
more sugar in your water? Children: No. Teacher: Then what did it do, Erin? Erin: It dissolved. Teacher: It dissolved. Narrator: The new vocabulary
words will mean the most if they relate to concepts
and activities that already interest the children. Use books that have new
and appealing vocabulary. Be excited when children ask,
“What’s that mean?” And be prepared to give a definition
and help with the meaning of the word. Teacher: Neighbor, what’s a neighbor? Child: A neighbor. Teacher: A neighbor is somebody
who lives really close to you. The next apartment or the next…? Child: House. Teacher: House Neighbor. Say that word.
One, two, three… All: Neighbor. Girl: My neighbor, his name is Perry, he lives across the street. Teacher: Across the street. Narrator: Other classroom toys
and materials can also help build vocabularies. Know the names for all
the vehicles in the block area or all the tools in the toolbox or all the shoes in the dress-up area. And think of interesting
and vivid words to describe all those materials. Even with the best of
plans, it can be difficult to remember to use novel words and to remember a good definition while in the midst
of a classroom activity. Use reminders like word lists and notes
to help spark your own memory. In this presentation, we
introduced teaching practices to help build young
children’s vocabularies, provide exposure to new words, teach new words and
their meanings, and offer opportunities
to use novel words. Thank you for listening. Check out our tips for teachers
and useful resources to fill your teacher tool kit
with ideas you can use. Have fun in the world of new,
novel, interesting, appealing, and wonderful words.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *