14 thoughts on “Management vs leadership

  1. Sometimes maintaining and managing the order of things is the most leader like thing one can do when faced with change that will damage. If leaders are defined by change then there will never be stability. I find all this "vs." talk to be mostly immature, myopic, and silly. Talks like this are given by people who stopped doing either one a long time ago and now need to innovate drama to justify a paycheck. Leaders and managers are myths. If a leader initiates change then they must also put in place best practices to manage it. We are people who are tasked with the health of an organization. We are always EVER both managers AND leaders. The question is not "Which one are you?" but "How good are you at practicing them?"

  2. At first thankyou aii of you by tour invitation to write the comment 
    I've seen more "leaders" come into situations that are already working/functioning, only to attempt to implement their version/vision of change. If it ain't broke then don't fix it. Change to fix something is good but change for changes sake is not. One doesn't make their mark as a leader by simply creating change…that is BS. Ones makes their mark by creatingestablishing the best team possible to implement the strategic goals

  3. From my experience, leaders grow, managers don't. In order to become a much better manager, you need to grow yourself daily. To me, thats a great leader.

  4. Status Quo have been going for years because they are making money, leadership is chancing you arm, it may get bitten off and so only successful leaders exist the rest have had their arms bitten off

  5. you need both. but you can easily get managers who are not leaders, and have no ability to lead. so they can certainly be mutually exclusive. leadership is something very different than management. leaders generally manage well because that is the harder of the two, but there are tons of managers who don't understand the difference because they are not leaders.

  6. I don't think any of them are right because they seem to be discussing management and leadership as two mutually exclusive positions. They are not. A grocery store manager can lead and get people to follow as much as desired but if they don't meet their objectives within the constraints they get in trouble. The kindergarten teacher crossing the road has to get the kids across before a car comes and hits them (management) while making sure the kids hold onto the rope (leadership). You need both.

  7. Example of a good manager who isn't a good leader: stay-in-home moms. Yes, they manage a lot, and yes they do it well to very well. But rarely they are able to lead. Anybody dis-/agrees?

  8. To be perfectly frank, I don't think any of these people have it right when they're trying to explain the difference between a manager and a leader. Honestly, I'm yet to see a good manager who isn't a good leader. It's as simple as that. Leaders can be counsellors, teachers, politicians, colleagues, officers, managers, supervisors and much more. I have a feeling this is all part of the new wave of feel good attitudes where people forget goals for being nice and good.

  9. I've seen more "leaders" come into situations that are already working/functioning, only to attempt to implement their version/vision of change. If it ain't broke then don't fix it. Change to fix something is good but change for changes sake is not. One doesn't make their mark as a leader by simply creating change…that is BS. Ones makes their mark by creatingestablishing the best team possible to implement the strategic goals.

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