Executive Panel | The Art of Leadership for Women | Toronto 2019

Executive Panel | The Art of Leadership for Women | Toronto 2019



good afternoon Toronto how was lunch lunch was good for some of you for others I guess we're not quite there yet so welcome back from the lunch break as you're getting settled back in your seats again I really have some exciting artwork to draw your attention to so on the right hand side of the hall you will see here Caroline of brilliance mastery and she is a phenomenal visual facilitator trainer and an teacher and actually for everyone who's here today stop by her booth not just to see the pictures but also she has a special offer on May 16th she is going to be teaching this craft of learning and visual facilitation and for anyone that's here today there's an opportunity for you to get a bit of a deal on that and so if you want to learn how to do visual facilitation take a look at the pictures of each of our speakers as well and also if we have your email address in the conference summary package you'll get from us at the end of next week you will likely have every one of those pictures in the package as well professional pictures of it so look forward to that so let me check in with you how are you doing on meeting at least two people raise your hand if you've met someone someone anyone Wow okay Wow relationships are forming this is good how are we doing on a key insight from each speaker does everybody have at least one key insight from each of the speakers you've heard today phenomenal and as we take a look did everyone also receive a very special little gift on your seat as you came back and that is from saige peppermint hallo at the end of the executive panel they're going to take you through an exercise of what you two can do with peppermint hallo so I look forward to seeing and experiencing that with you and now as we talked about it's kind of interesting that a man is hosting the art of leadership for women and often times I actually moderate the executive panel but today we thought it'd be great to do something a little more special something a little different and so to actually moderate the panel today anique asher joins us today from Scotiabank in her role as SVP she leads the enterprise financial planning analysis and optimization team her role includes oversight of the global financial plan corporate function expenses finance optimization as well as a prioritization and capital allocation decisions of Scotiabank strategic project spend anike drives a custom vote customer focused culture throughout her team to deepen client relationships and leverage broader bank relationships systems and knowledge and neek holds her honors business administration and a master's business administration finance from the University of Western Ontario and she holds a chartered accountant designation as a champion of gender equality and diversity at Scotia Bank we are so excited to have her here today as a true representation of women in leadership please join me in welcoming annie kasher [Applause] hello everyone and it's so nice to actually be introduced i hear that long narrative about my experience but i all I took away is what bill said first which is someone special today so I'm happy about that I'm so honored to be here today as moderator of this panel and to be in the company of such amazing women not only the women that you're about to meet but also the fantastic women that are in the audience today and I had the opportunity to have lunch with a couple of those and for me there's such a great energy when you bring a group of women like this together and I'm really looking forward to hearing the perspectives of each of the panelists today and the benefit personally is not only the opportunity to be here at a leadership event on behalf of Scotiabank but also for me to hear firsthand some of the real-life experiences of the women that you're gonna hear from today and even in the short space of time that we've spent getting ready and getting to know each other I think you're going to be very excited and very engaged by the conversation that we're gonna have so without further ado please join me in welcoming Amanda Heather Margot Lee and Kate to the stage [Applause] so good afternoon ladies and thank you for joining I thought we before we get into a conversation that we could start off with just a brief introduction of yourself and what it is that you're hoping to get out of today's panel so Kate why don't we start with you well I am so excited to be back in my home province of Ontario yay I grew up in small town Ontario in my mother's fabric store where my passion for community and bringing people together and actually helping them feel better started and it was so exciting for us to move into the the Toronto and Ontario market and I just couldn't be more thrilled to be here with you today with these incredible women and talk about leadership LEED Chalmers and I'm the chief auditor at Sun Life and prior to that I think probably what got me more involved in what got me more involved in diversity inclusion was when I took on the role at PwC as the chief inclusion officer and I think that really is what got me passionate about the topic I certainly started coming to these events and I know this morning was insightful many people already have a lot of things to take away and I think I still remember my first conference and the topic was on how women are afraid to take risks and they were describing me and I spent 22 years at PwC and after that conference and not shortly after that I left my organization and took a risk and that's when I joined Sun Life so hopefully you'll get a lot out of this conference as well okay we'll leave Khloe has her family in the audience but mago hi it's a pleasure to be here my name is Margot Coit I'm a managing director with an organization called LHH Knightsbridge what I love about our organization and what I'm really hoping to get out of today is that we're all about leadership so if you know LHH Knightsbridge you might know us from the recruitment side of our business and we certainly help to promote and find great women for roles I lead our talent and leadership development business and we've learned a lot we've done research and we work with women and through diversity inclusion programs on really helping to elevate their leadership and help them to advance their careers and of course others know our organization through career and executive Career Transition services which again really helping women to find their vision their passion and position themselves well for their career so this is something that is very near and dear not only personally I'm passionate about it but also organizationally this is our business so happy to share that thanks fans wow there's a bit of a competition like I'm homegrown Toronto Heather Haslam I get to do marketing for ADP in Canada and ADP is a global leader in HR services and technology and as we get to do support and and provide Canadian businesses with the opportunity to elevate using their people as a competitive differentiator providing them the tools what I'm hoping to get out of today I've had the opportunity likely like the other panelists to attend a number of these and I always love taking a bit of a breath and listening and getting inspired by having other people elevate each other so that's what I'm hoping to get out thank you so much for having me okay great welcome everyone I'm Amanda Hodges and I lead marketing for North America at Dell technologies you know it adèle technologies diversity and inclusion is truly a piece of the fabric of our business and we don't do it to be nice we actually do it because it's a proven competitive advantage and you know I really want to use this time to share some of the things we're doing and also even more importantly learn from all of you and through the Q&A what other great ideas are out there that we can even take back and leverage and put into practice there's a lot going on and there's a lot to learn so it's great to have this opportunity to come together okay that's great Monda clearly you won the family competition so Canada yeah I think that's a great place to start there so why don't we start off with you and get your thoughts on what are some of these strategies that you think that can help women achieve more prominent roles and the organizations that they're in now and I can open that up to everyone so why don't you talk about that Amanda and then we can sort of get to everyone's thoughts I'm sure there's a there's a lot you can do including showing up so it's great to see everyone here I think my big three would be being passionate having a vision and because I'm in marketing knowing your brand what I'd say about being passionate and I said this earlier to lunch is business is the most competitive sport and people work hard and are very determined and are doing the right things and there's a lot of people that are out there doing that and to really gain that competitive edge it's night and day whether you're passionate or not about about what you're driving and I have an example where I was in Detroit Michigan working for GE plastics in the automotive division and I don't like cars so like I Drive a minivan which my husband doesn't really consider a car and you know I was working around the clock killing myself whatever I went out to lunch with a bunch of customers they spent the whole time talking about cars and I had nothing to talk about like I just I just wasn't gonna make it I wasn't gonna make it to the next level and so you know it really prompted me to think about what do I care about what am i passionate about what should I do where should I go which kind of led me back to business school and let me technology in front of all of you today so I'd say really being thoughtful about what are you passionate about what are you gonna jump out of bed it's gonna give you the edge really quickly on just vision like where are you going right and it can be broad if you look at the leaders across your organization or look at different industries but having a vision of where you're going and starting to have those conversations now about you know I'd like to I'd like to be in that job these are the type of things that I'm interested in you know having that conversation before those roles open up instead of waiting to when the role opened up and it's like well I didn't know you were interested or you should have been doing these three things right knowing like you know three to four roles ahead of where you want to go and starting to work on that ahead of time is good and then last thing like I said from a marketing perspective know your brand right be purposeful about your brand you have a brand whether you're working on it or not right people have an opinion of you and what you're good at and what your strengths are so pick the couple things that you want to focus on for me it's technology its Women in Technology its marketing transformation and I do a lot with children and you know in the community with underprivileged children and in different communities and so I focus my time on those three things it helps me prioritize myself it's one of the reasons that I'm here today because it's something that I'm passionate about so those are the big ones passion and vision and brand yeah that's great I feel like you were eavesdropping on our conversation at lunch cuz Heather and I were we're talking about the same thing so she stole a little bit of my thunder but I guess that's part of the point what I I think my number one strategy to start off with is having a trigger that helps me get out of my head and what I mean by that is you know sometimes there's that inner dialogue that's distracting or even counterproductive at times knowing when when that's happening and how to get beyond it is an important strategy for me I always think for me it's something that I wrote down in a notebook once I was early on in my career and working on a fairly strategic project and I got to attend this meeting with seemingly intimidating people so the president of the business unit were in her office it's a big her office it's a big boardroom and there's all of these stakeholders around the table and it gets to the point where everybody's weighing in and adding in different lenses and perspectives and all of a sudden the head of sales says something really smart and I think to myself what's wrong with me that I didn't consider that oh they're probably all thinking that they're probably all thinking oh my goodness oh my goodness what's wrong with her she shouldn't be leading this project you know what they're probably thinking well she is by far the most junior person and then well why is she not taking notes why she not take notes oh my gosh they're probably a horrified so I get my book and I get on my pen and I write down I'm taking notes and that to me is the trigger to you know in terms of a strategy on how to move forward that that's one another one and unfortunately it took me really until recently to learn recognized that really successful people don't ask for permission they listen to Nike they they assume that empowerment you know they take risks they have courage when they know it's the right thing they tell you whether or not that's because they're gonna take their kid to a Christmas concert or invest somewhere in the business they just do it and so that that to me is a second big one oh good I love the clap I love I love the the participation and then the very similar to what Amanda said about the brand is knowing what your strengths are knowing what that to me is a strategy it's it's understanding you know what you're really good at what makes you special what is the thing that comes a little more easily to you so that you know how to build that up and focus on it yeah it's great it's good insight Pago I have a technical term for the voice in your head it's called the itty-bitty shitty club we all have had that I'm going to start with something that's a little different in terms of there's a lot of talented women here and I would suggest that one of the first things we can do to advance our careers look for organizations that are receptive to advancing talented women right there are a lot of leading organizations out there who are doing terrific things to make an organization and a culture that is really receptive and encouraging and advancing all sorts of diversity in their organizations and we owe ourselves to find those organizations and and be part of them we can be selective we can be choosy and I think that's an important power that we have and we don't always use is to really find that receptive audience and I would say secondly and just building on you know have your vision and share that vision is really important and the research that is out there recent research around women do tend to expect that just doing good work is enough and that somehow magically people will see that and they'll tap you on the shoulder and you will be elevated to higher and more senior roles and I don't want to burst anybody's bubble or be a downer on the day but it just doesn't happen that way that often right there are always going to be exceptions to the rule but for the most part we really do need to be comfortable sharing the vision speaking up being confident about what we can do knowing our brand all of those other things but you just can't wait to be tapped on the shoulder and automatically elevated and the third point that I'll speak to is really again based on some of the research that we know that's different about gender is that women are really good at networking but more so at peer level and below and that's terrific we need to be able to do that right but for career advancement women really need to be comfortable also networking up with people who have influence on their career and so that can be something that men are really more comfortable at and again these are broad paintbrushes don't anybody tweet but we know that from the gender research that women need to be generally really strengthening that muscle about networking up and looking for the people who can have influence on their own careers that really resonates with me I feel like you and you say you paint that broad brush you're really talking about me because that's something that I've always struggled with in my career as well and I find when you find women in the organizations that help you identify that it makes a big difference Lee s I just want to start I love sitting on these panels because I learned so much so everything I've heard is certainly not things I would have come up with but really will take away from this conference so what I thought of was you know if I look back on my south 20 years ago what are the things I know now that I wish I had known so one is about you know building relationships authentic relationships is for me what's critical I had one point my career and I thought I was gonna be really strategic and I saw a senior partner and I knew you know there was a potential he was gonna be CEO and I sort of thought you know I don't know him I want him to be my mentor and it was a bit of a matching program well that didn't go very far we you know we met and but you know at the end the day I just felt like I'd lead from those feeling more depressed and less motivated but it was those relationships that I built you know when you're in the weeds working long hours with people and they proven yourself and or you had a connection with someone and in hindsight those are the relationships that really made a difference in my career the second one I'd say is take risks obviously you heard it took me 22 years to take a risk I sort of look back and think if I take in more risks what would that have looked like so that's the the second one and then the last one is about you know being willing to you know it's sort of tied to both of those but it's getting out of your comfort zone getting out of your regular practice area taking on new challenges or new opportunities and being visible I guess as you do that because you know I think it goes to the point of putting your head down and thinking because you do good work you'll get recognized you know when I got put forward for partner obviously everybody I worked with was supportive but then it came out there's a few people who's kind of said you know I don't know Lee she sits in a room and their office gets her work done and in hindsight I mean that almost hurt me and you know I saw that as more people we're getting put forward to that next promotion it's about being visible and having people know who you are and know what you're capable of yeah so much wisdom up here one of the things that we talk a lot about at Sage and one of our values one of our core values is that of growth and I know you're all here because you're interested in growth but when I think about growth I think about it in terms of how I'm growing as a person as opposed to necessarily you know how the business is growing we know that we need talent we need technical skills we need IQ but I think that the biggest thing that propels us forward whether we're men or women is our self-awareness and our emotional quotient and we the great thing about this is you can practice this in line at Starbucks you can practice this when you you know go home to your family to your friends and you can certainly practice this in your careers but the how I break that down how we can raise our emotional quotient is first of all through our self-awareness we've talked about this here what am I good at how do I learn things what are environments where I can set myself up to win what am I good at what am I not good at what can take me out so really learning and building on your self-awareness and there's so many tools to do that the second thing I think about raising our emotional quotient is around our ability to take responsibility and we see over and over again in leadership you will know this from people on your teams you know when the place is on fire and things are not going well and the people that start pointing fingers and shirking responsibility they are not the people you want to promote they are not the people on your team it doesn't matter if you were in the building when the place was on fire if you're able to step up and say I'm gonna be responsible for this I'm gonna help make change I'm gonna take this on my shoulders what happens we get more responsibility and I think it's one of the ways again as women that we really stand up and improve our emotional quotient and be able to be in position to get greater roles and the third thing that I think about around raising how we are emotionally is what we tell ourselves so I think that we can you know what are the things that take ourselves out and one of the things that I talk about a lot is don't compare the inside of your life all of the things you know about yourself you know you've got the inside track to the outside that you see with other people and in today's world of you know so much we're all living so much more public lives than we certainly were when I started my career you know everything you ever want to know about someone you know is available online and guess what it's the glossy picture that we see out there and then we take that and all of those successes and we assume that other people don't have any you know any insecurities any faults and we look at the inside of who we are and we think oh I don't think I can put my hand up for that and so don't take yourself out by comparing that outside view you have of other people to your inside thanks like this I always take sort of a little book with me and I write down the key themes I'm taking away from this and as this is going on I'm making these mental notes and I'm running out of space because I think there's so much good insight here and just the themes around networking and take risks and know your brand something that just resonated with me so I want to switch gears a little bit and I'm gonna start with you Lee and this is a big topic so I think that it can be hard to get it into a couple of sentences as to how you approach this but I want to talk about diversity and inclusion and I want to get your thoughts on what Sun Life is doing to raise the spotlight on diversity and inclusion and specifically women in leadership great thank you you know I've only been at the organization two years and I already have a great contingent here with me so I'm really excited to share with you certainly I'll sort of focus on three commitments and I and first of all I'd have to say if coming from internal audit if I see it as a very good place to work that's that's a high bar because it is a hard role to really get a lens on on that organization so I'd say there's three things that we're doing that I'm quite proud of and so the its it's about commitments it's about buy-in from the leaders and it's about focusing on accelerated talent development and succession planning so on the commitments this is something that the CEO came out with in his leadership team two years ago about the need to have gender equity with it all in art within all of our businesses so our leaders are focused on looking at their current leadership focusing on how do we get to gender equity how do we better represent our people and our clients so that's a huge focus and it's a strong commitment from the top I was saying at lunch we have a board of directors with four of eleven women and those women are very vocal and and strong so the voice up top is it's a strong commitment from the top the next one is about the buy-in from the leadership so I feel like the conversation has shifted from you know this is a tick box exercise this is a nice-to-have I think we heard it already it's about we this is important and if we're gonna compete this is something we have to do as opposed it's something that's nice to do and then the last thing I think that I'm really impressed with when I came into the organization is that they take succession planning seriously so it's looking at all our senior roles and particularly on my team I can speak to you know exactly what I'm doing but we're taking all of the key roles and looking at what does the pipeline look like and then stepping back and saying does it represent diversity do we have the right gender balance and if not why and you know it's not something that's immediate it's sort of are you are they ready this year are they ready two to five years or after five and so you should really be able to fill up that slate and figure out if they're not ready now what do they need to get there so what are the assignments you're gonna give them what are the opportunities you're going to give them and I think you know maybe it's you know me coming from professional services to the corporate world but I was really impressed with that and and they take it very seriously so that's great and that I think that really resonates with all of us just the importance of putting the spotlight on it and being methodical on looking at it every year and I want to just touch on a little bit of the point that Heather made and I'm gonna ox Amanda you this question and that's one mentorship and the importance of mentorship and I wanted to kind of get your thoughts on mentorship and sponsorship and think of those two together and do you think both are really needed and how do you see those two working together I'm gonna ask the audience a question maybe first do you raise your hand if you think that sponsorship and mentorship are different and do you have both different and both so this this I think the side of the roommate might have a little bit more I you know I would I would argue that they are different and I use them very differently so so I'll share with you a couple examples and then you guys can decide if you want to put it back into practice you know I'd say the mentorship and I look for mentors I heard Lee you mentioned mentors as well I look for mentors all different levels of the organization for all different things depending on what I need I need somebody who is developing strategy I look who's good I need somebody who's navigated their career I looks good I look at people that speak all the time and I'm like I like their style and I pick different people across the organization internally and externally for different things that I'm trying to plan on and develop and when people actually ask me to be a mentor the best experiences I have on the opposite side is when they come prepared and say you know I'm working on X can you help me and then six weeks later have a follow up and said hey I tried these three things they worked or didn't work you know here's the next thing I want to work on so being really really purposeful about that mentorship one where I differentiate and draw the line for sponsorship is that's the person in these reviews that's gonna pound the table for you and say you might know Lee but she's the best we've got and and and and if you know I'll advocate on her behalf or I'll introduce you and get exposed to you and really really is gonna drive your agenda forward that typically works when you've worked with them when you've been on a cross projects when they've been exposed to you but I've also seen it work really well I have someone that I actually have not worked with yet they meet with me pretty regularly every three to four months and we catch up but they also use part of that time to show me a project that they're working on so they'll come in with you know a little bit of a deck or a problem and say hey here's what I'm working on here's how I presented it they'll present it to me I'll give feedback I'll engage in dialogue so I have really really good data points to express because a lot of times people meant to say I want to be a mentor or a sponsor and they'll talk to me and I'll say they're really nice you know but I really can't compare their output and their business acumen and you know their drive for results and all those pieces unless you know I personally see it in action or they are purposeful about showing that delivering it to so at you know I don't know if you guys have other opinions but I would argue that they are different and when you're looking for them be super purposeful about that time it's you know it's valuable for that person you're talking to but also for your time as well and Heather do you have anything to add I know we were talking about that a little bit as well and and how do you see you know using reverse mentorship let's say and has that been something that you think that we can build and be successful of doing sure so this idea of reverse mentorship is when seemingly the more junior or less experienced person younger person is actually helping to mentor somebody more senior one of the things that we're doing around mentorship at ADP is actually reciprocal mentorship so this idea that it's it's two-way so it works for both the established and the emerging leader and so this idea is really very similar to what Amanda said around being prepared you know it has to have structure but it's actually about getting you to co-create what those goals are so that you know what it is that you're meeting for so that it's not just a catch-up and the the element of trust that comes when it's two people being vulnerable with each other is unbelievable it is huge it just happens so much faster when both people show up and they open themselves vulnerable highlight what it is that they want that help with we're just seeing the results amplified that's great and Margo I want to get your thoughts on this as well like what have you learned and given your experience in your role I think you're perfect to answer this for us around how do you set up those relationships for success so if you to give some advice to the audience to be more tactical around how we should think about doing that what would you say I think there's a couple of things around mentorship sponsorship and I'll throw coaching in there as well because this is really all about developing us so that we can advance in our careers and we need all three we need all three for sure to set up a really great mentorship relationship whether its internal or external that structure is really important that setting of expectations and we find over the course of our career that what we need is gonna be different you know early on it might be what we do and how do we do that I don't know how to code this I don't know how to make this kind of a presentation later in our career it might be around how do I advance what really goes on who are the people I need to be networking with that do have influence right so it's about that organization but you need to be really clear upfront to say this is what I'm expecting a bit of a contract in place really so that you know I'd like to meet every month I want to meet every two weeks I want to meet only once every three or four weeks so that there's clarity around the expectation and that point around respect is huge coming prepared with I have a question I have an issue I want to talk something through I want to share something but being really clear about that so you're using time wisely and that goes whether it's an internal mentor or an external mentor and I think we often think about internal mentors only because they're about how you advance within your own organization you might have organizational support because there's a formal program in place to set that up but we also need external mentors sometimes it helps us to be more vulnerable with somebody who's not involved in your own organization but you're also wanting to think about what are the external trends and what's going on in my industry you're gonna get more or different types of mentorship when you look outside your own organization so though there's some of the things that I would really think about tactically in terms of structuring whether its internal or external beginning mid or latter points in your career that's great insight in I'm still writing in my head so it there's a lot Kate I want to switch to you now because I think you have a very different perspective to add to this panel that we're all sort of in this corporate world and you know I'm fourth generation of a family family business and I've never run worked in a family business ever so I really want to get your thoughts what is it like share your experiences for those of us that might be thinking of a very different path than what the others of on this panel have done and give us some insight on that well I get asked a lot what it's like in a family business and I can say that it's very intense it's very rewarding and it's sometimes very challenging and I'm sure in many ways that sounds a lot like any of your careers here so I'd like to see a show of hands for anyone who is currently or has worked inside a family business in any way shape or form keep your hand up and tell me if you might think that you might at some point in your future start a family business now think about whether the people that you work with today who aren't technically your family feel like family anyone find themselves in that situation we spend more time with people in our workplace than many of us do with our family members so it's not unnatural that we develop relationships where we're close where we actually if we're honest might say I love that person and I think that for me my daughter has joined the business 10 years ago I've worked with my husband since the beginning of it and I think there's two pieces to it there is the shared values that bring us together but if you're starting a business with a friend with a family member you also want to really have your own clear areas of expertise and that's been you know really important because I always say if both of us are the same one of us isn't necessary but the part that I want to come back to around being in a family business and whether that's a real family or someone you're really close to is it can become really hard to give the tough feedback you can tell yourself stories oh maybe that will go away maybe maybe that was just today maybe here she's just having a bad day and I think it's upon all of us to be good leaders too I say like keep the kitchen clean you know we all know it's easier to dislike rinse out a glass at a time and keep things under order and it's the same with our relationships if we let things get built up and now we're sitting down having conversations and you know it has piled up or we're talking about things that happened last month or three months ago and it's really hard to keep our relationships on track so I think from being a family business it has been even more intense and more important that we keep really current in our communications and we don't let things build up and we give people the honest feedback and we elicit the honest feedback that can help us all keep growing pot that worries me about that I don't know if you can work with your husband and give on his feedback but Lee I want to switch gears a little bit you've had a very interesting career and thank you for sharing that from professional services and just that you know that thought process that you went through to how you made the switch after all those years what's been the key differentiator for you that you think that really helps you get to where you want to be away you are now in your career no thanks for that question I think you know this was a really easy question for me to answer it's very clear its role models so when I joined the firm I you know just out of school from day one I always worked with women I was rounded by women you know it turns out you know both the first women partner at the firm was still in my team and I still worked with her you know by the time I made partner there was probably three or four women partners by the time I left there was more women partners than men and that again is just in our team if you looked broader obviously you know they're uh they're making progress we're not there they're not there yet but for me I always looked up and thought you know if they can do it I can do it and I had some very specific women that I worked quite a bit with and one for example every night would leave at 5:00 she had three kids and you know if anyone's here in professional services that is rare even in audit busy season she was leaving every night at 5:00 and I thought if she can balance I can do it the other one that is sort of another role model who sort of set sort of mine this sort of how I am as a leader and you know I didn't think of it at the time and it was more when I left the firm and someone said to me you know you're a really authentic leader like you're who you are you don't pretend to fit in with the men and I realized there was one woman and if anyone works with this person they'll know who I'm talking about but she had known even probably know where he has no hesitation we'll be in a meeting she'll put on her lipstick or before any event she'd go get her hair done and be telling everybody in the office or she'd be walking to a this is I wasn't there for this one but the rumors were that she would be walking to a meeting with you know five men to a big bank meeting and she'd make everyone stop so she could put her high heels on so I just found to me that's sort of what I learned from and my whole career was like and then leaving I realized wow you know people aren't doing that at Sun Life you know they're not sort of putting their lipstick on which maybes not quite so appropriate but I think I you know I look back and really appreciate that because I feel like I never had to pretend I was someone I was not I never felt like I didn't fit in and and I realize now that that was not normal and I was one of the lucky ones so I think you know that's why I feel now you know it's my responsibility to speak up and I think all of us in the room to really make people feel like they can be their true self and I think you can't underscore the importance of taking that role in an organization because when you haven't worked in a company where you can look up and say I want to be just like that woman it's not as easy to do it when it's a man just because there's other compensating factors so that exactly exactly what you say is sort of how I felt on that um and I want to switch to you now and just talk about you've been Adel for some time now and what does the organization culture been like for women when you joined versus when you are you know you talked about how purposeful dell has been in all of the work that i've done so have you seen that transition happen and is it going at the pace that you think it should be going at it it's been amazing I've been itself for fourteen years now and you know and listening to everybody speak I think it is shifted from being something that was organic and women getting together and meeting just something that's been more a business imperative now when you're talking about you know from Michael Dell and his executive leadership team down really driving this and so that's been a huge shift and it has come fast and furious particularly in the last I'd say the last two years and you know I'd offer up two ideas of things that we've done I think one is you know back to this business imperative more men are a part of the conversation so we have a woman in action and play resource group it's almost 20 percent men I see a lot of men here yeah thank you because not all women initiatives or diversity includes initiatives have men this is a business issue and so women alone aren't gonna change this and so Michael in the leadership team we've invested in this program Marc training many advocating for real change and it's about our unconscious biases everybody has them I have them right and so it's something that Michael has ELT the whole management all managers and Dell will be trained by the end of the year it's a half-day experience it's phenomenal but really getting us all aware of how we drive diversity inclusion to get better results and I'd say the second thing is like anything change happens when there's a burning platform and particularly in the technology industry there is a shortage of skilled technology technology skill set in the market there's there's two hundred and sixteen thousand women that are unemployed technically skilled women that are unemployed at any time because they've taken time off for families for elderly care for whatever personal issues that is so we've also started a restart program you know and I think that's the other big thing it's not like talking about it and being aware of it but putting the tools and the resources in place to make an entry path back for women that have been out of the workplace and really anyone you know diverse and inclusive but particularly for women to get them a path back we need their talent we need their skills there's a burning platform to to create that so I could go on with these questions and I know that we're running a little short of time and we want to get to audience Q&A but Heather I want to ask you just a question quick thoughts on what resources would you recommend for women who were starting to think about how do I be a better leader like what's the colds notes that you would we'd give to us okay Hinton Coles no first we've heard a little bit of this said actually already but I call it my own personal board of directors so my number one resource the the thing that I find most important to me and in terms of effort and investment I cultivate those relationships I have board of director and they come from multiple places in my life that I've accumulated through the years in and outside of of where I'm working and just like friends right you don't have one friend that serves all purposes I really heard that you you need this group and so you know we don't often think about the relationships that we have those really important relationships that we have as a resource but that that's kind of number one and then I would say number two and it's just an interesting take on how we absorb feedback so Kate alluded to the importance of providing feedback quickly but it's also about how we internalize what it is that we're hearing and actually open ourselves up enough to listen and take that in so I think of feedback as also a resource it's often comes from the fact that I've created relationships with people where there is enough trust so that they can help me understand if there's a difference between what my intention is and what the impact is you know I know what my intention is because it's fine but I'm not always aware of exactly what the impact is so having those those relationships so that I can get feedback a novel approach to a resource so I could go on forever because I feel like I'm getting a lot of advice here but I'm gonna turn it over to Bill who's gonna be have a mic and so if anyone has questions in the audience and wants to aux from anyone please feel free to to do that now I'm curious as to what was the biggest challenge or opportunity you struggled with during your career mago do you want to take that and maybe kid I think one of the things that goes back to that vision thing what do I really want taking the time to reflect and think about it and be able to articulate it I think you know we have a we have a sense of wanting to be in control and get things done and to really open myself up and think about what do I want it to be as a leader what do I want from my career and how then do I put a plan in place to make that happen it's not easy to self-reflect to look in the mirror and to come up with that it can be really challenging to be that brave or to be that bold to say it out loud all of my life or my career I think I thought of the term CEO equals Jack Welsh who's the guy behind the desk with the deep voice and he was in charge maybe he pounded the desk I'm not sure in my vision and I think the bit hardest thing for me when it was suggested that I take over a CEO from my husband it was changing my mind and getting past the point where I thought that I had to be different than who I was that I could actually like take this role and lead from Who I am as opposed to who I thought that I had to be I'm just gonna add that the research shows that even women who are in CEO roles if you had talked to them 10 years or 20 years earlier would not have told you that they aspire to be a CEO so again just going back to that thinking about what do I want to be can I be that unlocking that is so critical I might just add one thing I guess for me it's always been about balance so you know I always sort of think to the times when people say you know how do you do it all and I always roll my eyes and think you have no idea you know between being you know working full-time between having kids between being a wife and then trying to have some time for your friends or for the gym or and I just feel like I never can do it all so you sort of have to accept you're not going to be able to be perfect at everything seem to have some technical difficulties I can share my I'll share mine while we're coming see I knew that as soon I was gonna say as soon as you got that going there was gonna work I thank you ladies so my question I fast getting billet work out him that's all so my questions for Kate Kate my name is Tanya I've connected with you on LinkedIn a few months back I don't know if you remember me I'd be pricey I'm a big big fan of your brand sage I incorporated all those products into my home into my life I would love to connect with you after this if you have 15 minutes that was so easy I'd love to thank you see she's reaching out and connecting with working well done asking for sponsorship is right there right that's right perfect example that you were listening Kate you might get a big head here because I also wanted to say something to you so I actually consider myself a victim of women in leadership I exited the corporate world after 15 years of becoming a new mom three times over three Matt leaves you spend a year out of the workforce and then you get back there and yet you try to keep climbing that ladder and figure out what to do once I left the corporate world I actually became a leadership and development coach after investing three years into building myself up so when you speak about whole person about focusing on the whole person not just who you are at work and that that's who you need to bring to work and when you lead from who you are not who you think you need to be I kind of want to throw a challenge out to all the female leaders to start creating an environment that is not just about being the best skill but literally being your whole self and and all the messages of vulnerability that I heard today that's the stuff that we need to see in leadership roles so that everyone can be human at work and perform their best just just a word thank you I'm something I just want to tack on to that something we do at the end of our exact meetings is we do this little go-around we literally draw names out of a hat and we just do like a two-minute appreciation for whoever you drew and I feel like there's so many cues that we get and give each other as women most of my exec team is women and it's it's a way that when you get recognition for something you are in a way getting permission for something so I think we have a great opportunity to give each other more absolute appreciation and we learn from that thank you and I would just add to that that you know I think it also depends on the world and the cooperation that you do work in because I work in an organization where we start a lot of our meetings talking about what went well and what we're grateful for and what are not talking about what didn't go well and what were the challenges and and so I think you can bring that in to the corporations that you work with as well and you don't only get to do that if you work in a family business even though I know it sounds a lot more fun stage then I'm gonna count them so it's not nearly as exciting so do we have any more questions from the audience okay she's jumping after keep jumping I can't see that far okay this will be a lot yes yes yes demanded very supportive crowd thank you so my question is for Amanda he stated doll for 14 years was just amazing so what are your top three reasons why I stayed at that company for that long I'd say people people and passion you know what the people side of it and a couple of people touched on it you know I had three babies when I was at Dowell I've worked part time I've taken a leave of absence I went over to Australia my husband was moving to over to Australia and so I went in and said hey I'm quitting they're like why husband's going to Australia they're like we'll figure it out so I went over that I mean I've just had great great leaders I was gonna share about the the people thing was when I had my first baby that was the hardest thing for me I again I guess I'm a quitter I walked in and I was like I quit and my boss who was a woman at the time said why what are you doing I said I don't know but like this morning I poured orange juice in my cereal and I'm exhausted and I just I didn't know how to set boundaries and she said to me hey find the least amount of hours you can work which was 20 hours I signed up for 80% but whatever and you know try it and make it work and it gave me a permission to like say no and set boundaries to your point leave the office at 5:00 all these things that I just didn't realize because my life has changed so I've had great great people I had somebody come up to me after a panel that said hey I had that same conversation with and it just happened to be a male at the time and he said good luck I understand you know and that could have been my career path so just people people people have been absolutely amazing at Dell technologies and then the passion I mean I truly think and for all of you that use technology in your life that we are really changing the world I mean we are giving economic development to people to countries I mean it's just amazing the future ahead of us with technology so I hate to break this up and I I want to keep going but the young and it asks you to tell me and maybe we'll kind of go down the line as well what are you excited about if you think about the next couple yes and your crow what is it the three words three words that you're excited about for me it's about all of us being the workplace being at a place where you can be your true self whether we're talking about mental health diversity gender it's being comfortable at work okay not a good accountant that was not three words Margo I don't know I can keep it to three men and women working together to advance women okay getting better Heather I'll say learning collaboration and Happiness the marketing person got the three words right please take action that good so Kate I'm gonna give you closing comments and if we're sitting here yeah from now celebrating what a great year it has been for you maybe you're over a glass of wine in your current role what what are you celebrating and what progress have you made with your organization well I'm gonna ask for all of your help with what would make this year even more incredible for me so it would be that the world reaches for natural first that we reduce our dependency on pharmacopoeia and I'm wondering who will get out there peppermint halo put it out for me in your right hand if you've used it before yeah every day I love this woman she come up and help me okay get it in your right hand if you've used it now show me a show of hands if you have a headache right now oh we got some headaches here anyone feeling a little sluggish maybe we had a little bit of a great lunch and it's starting to settle the other thing that I'm so excited to be able to help everyone with which I know because we're in this room we're suffering from it and it's what I call Technic which is this curvature we're all starting to develop from the hours that we spend hunched over our screens so I'd love you to release your peppermint halo from its its box and get it out take off the top lid here and we're gonna have a little G pop moment at Sage we call that getting the product on the people so take a nice little smell here's move back your beautiful hair that you've got and exposed this right side of your neck and give yourself a nice roll on there the deeper you can get down into your trapezius the better I'm gonna do this with my fellow panel members and you're gonna start to feel the peppermint is creating circulation bringing more blood to your brain you're gonna be breathing in some lavender which is helping to calm your nervous system get some down here you've got a great blow son for this get some rosemary which speeds up healing and you know we notice the room starts to chat we start to feel maybe like you know we've just sat down to a martini and that's because your body knows what's good for it so happiness and success for me would look like you reach for this in the middle of the day when you're starting to just feel a little sluggish maybe able to cut down on some of that caffeine consumption and so while we're here taking a big breath in I'm gonna invite you now to put down your peppermint halo unencumbered your self from whatever you've got in your hand put your feet flat on the floor if you can and close your eyes oh maybe and your mouth yeah probably need to say that with women right so we're gonna take a moment here in the power of this room to first take some big breaths in keep those eyes softly closed let's see if we can do that again smooth out your breathing feel that place of calm and while you're doing this think about all of the incredible wisdom that you have heard here today whether that was a peer that you shared a thought with someone that you heard up here on the stage whether it was an idea that was stimulated inside you through this powerful gathering and I would just like you as you're breathing and taking a moment for yourself and quiet to think about and lock in what is the one thing what's the one decision you're going to make that you aren't making right here today that you're gonna implement in your life for real that is gonna move you closer to who you are closer to your true self closer to your true potential and leadership and help you to create a bigger light shining from the essence of who you are I know that everyone here in this room is supporting you there's such power in clear intention and I thank you all for the courage you have and for the role that you are playing to elevate women across our country across the world thank you so I don't know what I could possibly see other than that in my closing but I wanted to say thank you for all of the questions I wanted to say thank you to all of the panelists for what I think was bringing their true self and their whole self to this discussion and showing that vulnerability because I think that's what makes it resonate with all of us and as I was reflecting on Kate's comments I was thinking the one thing that I'm gonna do is figure out how I can get some peppermint halo into my meetings at work and how that would actually go over if we we took those types of steps so thank you everyone and enjoy the rest of the day we appreciate thank you Thank You Annie Castro and the executive panel a round of applause thank you so much just thank you

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