Bidding on Foreign Government Procurement | Managing Challenges | Exporting Basics Episode 25

Bidding on Foreign Government Procurement | Managing Challenges | Exporting Basics Episode 25



Each year, trillions of dollars in foreign government
procurement opportunities are put out for bid. The World Bank estimates that developing countries alone
procure $820 billion annually. Worldwide, government
procurement accounts for 10 to 15 percent of GDP. U.S. companies, small to
large, can find opportunities in a variety of industries
from IT and communications, smart cities, energy,
environmental and healthcare technologies to
transportation, construction and consulting services. Infrastructure projects include
construction of roads, railways, airports, ports, power
generation facilities, hospitals, schools, water
treatment plants and more. U.S. consulting firms are highly
sought-after for their expertise in advising, technical
consulting, feasibility studies, and engineering and
design services. But bidding on foreign
procurements takes more than offering a quality
product or service at a competitive price. Here are some tips to get you
started: To pursue business with foreign governments,
focus on one to two markets and commit for the long term. Procurement requirements
vary by market, so consider your current
export markets first. Review each market's
Country Commercial Guide for best prospects and how
to sell to the government. Prepared by experts
at U.S. embassies, these guides offer the
latest market intelligence for over 140 countries. Find a local partner who is
a trusted government supplier with experience in
how to bid and win. Before a tender is
announced, get in markets early to develop valuable
relationships. You might shape the project
and create opportunities. Look for supply chain
opportunities with large companies who have
won or are bidding on projects. If the country is a member of the World Trade
Organization's Government Procurement Agreement, or has a
bilateral free trade agreement with the United States, you
may have guaranteed rights to fairness, transparency,
and market access. The Commerce Department's
International Trade Administration, or ITA, can
advise you of your rights and work to ensure
you receive them. To research opportunities,
subscribe online to receive notices from the
World Bank and the European, Inter-American, African, and Asian Multilateral
Development Banks (MDBs). Also check the European Union,
Canada, and other websites. Before pursuing an opportunity, confirm it's a genuine
government project with funding. Some published opportunities
may not have funding or serious backing. It's important to know the
background and influencers that shaped the project's
scope and requirements. ITA's trade experts
in Washington, D.C. and in over 100 U.S.
offices and U.S. embassies and consulates in more than 75
markets, can help you learn more about the competitive
environment around a project, and other challenges
you may face. If you see an interesting
foreign government procurement opportunity, contact the
ITA Advocacy Center to speak with a country manager
or MDB liaison. Get help early to
affect the outcome. Advocacy assistance can help "level the playing
field" in several ways. The Advocacy Center coordinates
U.S. government interagency advocacy efforts on behalf
of U.S. exporters bidding on public-sector contracts
with overseas governments and government agencies. The Advocacy Center
has helped small, medium and large U.S. companies
in various industry sectors to win government
contracts across the globe. Visit export.gov/advocacy
to learn more. For more information on the
export process, you can: – Watch another video in the
Exporting Basics Video Series. – Subscribe online at export.gov to receive valuable
export information. – And Explore our Export Guides
and Trade Events calendar on the export.gov website.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *