9 Favorite World War 2 Novels – 100 Books A Year

9 Favorite World War 2 Novels – 100 Books A Year


Hello my reader friends, and welcome to my new book video. Today I’m sharing with you my 9 favorite novels set in the Second World War. In 2004, a friend of mine from India sent me his favorite book – Anne Frank’s Diary of a Young Girl. At the last page, I remember sitting in a daze while my mind tried to comprehend the facts that there wouldn’t be another entry to follow, that Anne was real and hers was a same fate as that of the six million Jews during the Holocaust. Up until that moment, WWII had been another lesson in my history class, distant and vague. In the past year, since I decided to spend more time reading, I’ve noticed that the books that often give me a lingering hangover are those set in the Second World War both first-hand accounts and fictions. In this video, I’ll focus on my nine favorite fictions, there will be another video for first-hand accounts later. First on my list is books about the female pilots in the Second World War. The first one is a very much anticipated
release of this year by Kate Quinn. I want to take a moment here to thank my cousins Tony and Sylina for introducing me to this amazing author In The Huntress, Kate Quinn weaves historical events with a thrilling tale of a British journalist and a Russian female bomber pilot on their cross-Atlantic hunt for a Nazi war criminal. The story also reveals the stigma and challenges that the female
pilots in Russia had to overcome to serve in the war and the process to
bring war criminals to justice. Contrasting with Quinn’s chilling account
is Fannie Flagg’s story of the female pilots in America in one of her best-selling
novels The All-Girl Filling Station’s Last Reunion. In her trademark story-within-a-story set in an idyllic Southern town, and filled with interesting facts about the US female pilots in the war, Fannie Flagg delivered a witty and quirky tale about the lives of the two women in two generations that surely will warm your heart. One question I always have in mind when reading about the Second World War is about life in Germany during and after the war. How did people cope? Was there a movement against Hitler? And how about the generations after the war? And I found my answers in the next three novels. The Book Thief reveals life in Germany under the Nazi destructive regime. Yet even during this darkest and most chaotic of times where evil seems to reign, there still shines the light of hope through love for one’s family, for language and literacy, and for friendship. Even the book’s unusual narrator – Death – is given a sense of care rather than fear as he explains how he feels when he must take the life of each character. The Women in the Castle offers a rather unusual perspective of Germany during the Nazi period as the story revolves around the wife of an aristocrat involved in the Nazi resistance, a young girl desperate to escape her poor town but got caught in a war much bigger and more horrific than she was prepared for, and a woman trying to get away from her Nazi entanglements and making the best for her children and herself. At the core of the book lies each of the
women’s experiences, attitudes, and feelings about the war, Germany and
their husbands, and what they need to do in the aftermath of the war to rebuild
their lives. Next is The Reader – a novel that deals
with the difficulties post-war German generations have had comprehending the Holocaust and coming to terms with the past. It has been translated into 45 different languages, and has been included in the circular of college-level courses in Holocaust literature and German language. My next two novels are about life during the occupation. Both novels are unflinching in their accounts of the atrocities of the war, but still convey a message of hope. All The Light We Cannot See brings a lyrically beautiful prose, well-developed characters, and the author’s superb attention for details and metaphors. There are parts in the novel that make me cry, but in the end there’s this flicker of hope
that whatever the odds, there are ways for people to be good to
one another. The Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Pie Society combines three things I love in a book, which is a book about books, a story within a story, and written as a series of letters. The remarkable cast of characters, radiant in their eccentricity and humor, braving through the hardships of the war, will make the readers smile even through tears. It’s a heartwarming story about courage under horrific conditions and human resilience. And now we’ve reached the most difficult
reading of all the books about the Second World War – books about the Holocaust. No matter what type of books I read about the Holocaust, nonfiction or fiction, it still hits me how such a horrific thing did happen. I read the German girl about two weeks ago. It started at the beginning of the war when the Nazis started separating and rounding up the Jews in Germany to camps. The book is based on the real-life event of the Saint Louis passenger line that carried over 900 German Jews fleeing to Cuba where they would stay on
transit visas were waiting for their US visas to be approved. Upon reaching the port of Havana, the passengers found out during the trip the Cuban government had invalidated their transit visas, thus denying them entry into Cuba. The US and Canada governments were also denying the passengers admittance to their countries, forcing them to return to Europe as it descends into war. Although criticized for its historical inaccuracies, I still love the heartbreaking story of The Boy in the Striped Pajamas. If you haven’t read it, I do have a warning though. This is not a book to read in public places if you want to avoid a public display of emotion. Come to think of it, you have a little boy whose father is a high-ranking Nazi officer directly involved in the concentration camp at Auschwitz, and the boy is befriending another little boy of the same age on the other side of a fence. Your heart is set to be broken. This list is just the beginning of my
reading on this event in our history. There are far many other great novels
in nonfiction about the Second World War. Some I have found to include on my to be
read list. No doubt it will enlighten me not only in learning about this part of
our history but also in human courage, resilience, hope, and above all else, kindness. Over to you – what’s your favorite Second World War book? Please share with me in a comment section. See you again in the next video.

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